SPECIAL EVENT

Tim Bedore's Animal Conspiracy

Comedian Tim Bedore speaks seriously, but only briefly, about the big news story of last week in which an Ohio man freed dozens of wild animals from the refuge he had built for them.

"It's hard to explain what this guy was thinking, obviously, to bring all this danger into Ohio," Bedore said from his home in Minnesota. "People wonder, was he angry, was he depressed?

"I think he was hypnotized by squirrels," Bedore added.

A stand-up comedian and weekly regular on radio's "Bob & Tom Show," Bedore holds out the theory of an animal conspiracy in which all creatures are plotting the overthrow of humans.

"The squirrels got to him and convinced him to let these critters go," he added.

Bedore's theory has grown through the years, with occasional news reports to back his conclusions.

"I connect the dots," he said. "And I don't know why I'm the only one who sees the connections in these things. But I point it out.

"I'm the Paul Revere of the human resistance to the animal conspiracy."

The 55-year-old comedian, who was born in Chicago and raised in Wisconsin before moving from California to Minnesota, performs Friday night at the Establishment Theatre in downtown Rock Island.

He says stand-up comedy takes a backseat to carpooling his 13-year-old daughter to high school hockey practice for much of the year.

"My life is pretty much based on her needs right now," he said.

Twice a day, he carts his daughter to practice at a rink 20 miles north of where they live, he said.

"That's the sacrifice we Minnesotans make for hockey," he added.

Bedore introduces his "Vague But True" segments on "Bob & Tom," he says that Minnesota is "where the introverts stare at their shoes and the extroverts stare at your shoes."

"There is that ‘Minnesota nice' personality that they even say about themselves. But they're too nice - freakishly nice," he added. "Four-way stops put these people into a brain freeze."

Those who do enter through the four-way standoff are then given a "stink eye," Bedore said.

"It's passive-aggressive weird," he added. "We're nice, but you're going to have to pay."

Bedore uses wordplay and a cerebral approach to his humor, something he's done since he was a host on a public radio station in Wisconsin.

"You have to be happy with it," he said of his selections. "It may not be what the audience wants, but it's a happy, successful, satisfying career.

"I just do what I want to be proud of," he added.

Bedore is at work writing his first novella as well as pitching his concept for a weekly National Public Radio show that would combine music with comedy.

"That's my plan," he said, adding, "But I also have to paint some storm windows."

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Comedian Tim Bedore speaks seriously, but only briefly, about the big news story of last week in which an Ohio man freed dozens of wild animals from the refuge he had built for them.

"It's hard to explain what this guy was thinking, obviously, to bring all this danger into Ohio," Bedore said from his home in Minnesota. "People wonder, was he angry, was he depressed?

"I think he was hypnotized by squirrels," Bedore added.

A stand-up comedian and weekly regular on radio's "Bob & Tom Show," Bedore holds out the theory of an animal conspiracy in which all creatures are plotting the overthrow of humans.

"The squirrels got to him and convinced him to let these critters go," he added.

Bedore's theory has grown through the years, with occasional news reports to back his conclusions.

"I connect the dots," he said. "And I don't know why I'm the only one who sees the connections in these things. But I point it out.

"I'm the Paul Revere of the human resistance to the animal conspiracy."

The 55-year-old comedian, who was born in Chicago and raised in Wisconsin before moving from California to Minnesota, performs Friday night at the Establishment Theatre in downtown Rock Island.

He says stand-up comedy takes a backseat to carpooling his 13-year-old daughter to high school hockey practice for much of the year.

"My life is pretty much based on her needs right now," he said.

Twice a day, he carts his daughter to practice at a rink 20 miles north of where they live, he said.

"That's the sacrifice we Minnesotans make for hockey," he added.

Bedore introduces his "Vague But True" segments on "Bob & Tom," he says that Minnesota is "where the introverts stare at their shoes and the extroverts stare at your shoes."

"There is that ‘Minnesota nice' personality that they even say about themselves. But they're too nice - freakishly nice," he added. "Four-way stops put these people into a brain freeze."

Those who do enter through the four-way standoff are then given a "stink eye," Bedore said.

"It's passive-aggressive weird," he added. "We're nice, but you're going to have to pay."

Bedore uses wordplay and a cerebral approach to his humor, something he's done since he was a host on a public radio station in Wisconsin.

"You have to be happy with it," he said of his selections. "It may not be what the audience wants, but it's a happy, successful, satisfying career.

"I just do what I want to be proud of," he added.

Bedore is at work writing his first novella as well as pitching his concept for a weekly National Public Radio show that would combine music with comedy.

"That's my plan," he said, adding, "But I also have to paint some storm windows."